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  • Day 1

    27 February

  • 09:30 - 09:45
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 09:45 - 10:00
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 10:00 - 10:45
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 11:15 - 12:00
    In our race for progressive technologies, we now see the tools that are available for the design of our buildings and infrastructure becoming increasingly sophisticated and, more importantly, data-driven. The use of algorithms, machine learning and generative design, not only vastly accelerate the traditional design process, but opens new ways of working by increasing the ‘search area’ for ideas and generating far more possible solutions. This places a greater emphasis on ideas and outcomes, and less on deliverables and documents. This shift is beginning to happen right now as we see manufacturing and construction converge, developing new systems and cross-platform working. This disruptive change is seeing ‘manufacture and assembly’ – not ‘construction’ – driving down costs and improving the long-term value of our assets, while creating new jobs and skills in manufacturing and assembly. But are we ready for it?
    Next Generation
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 11:15 - 12:00
    A comparative analysis between the current computational tools in Revit; this seminar should prove informative for the novice and highly entertaining for the proficient. The inevitable discussion of pros and cons when choosing the right tool for the job is brought to a new level, taking into account subjective factors like target skill level, scalability, adaptability and a lot more. Although the basis of this talk is based on Autodesk® Revit®, the knowledge is applicable to most contemporary software packages.
    Technology
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 11:15 - 12:00
    It’s fair to say that there’s a bit of hype around Blockchain: mention it to most people and it conjures images of Bitcoin, dangerous bubbles or the dark web. Like a lot of things cruising the hype cycle, it’s hyped for a reason. But there is nothing inherently exciting about Blockchain technology, which is in fact rather mundane. The really exciting part of blockchain is actually what it lets you do: which is trust. You can trust because you can verify. If you can anchor and record your transactions (any digital exchange of data) to a blockchain then you can be part of the big spreadsheet in the sky. In this session, Ian will cover an “Idiot’s Guide to Blockchain”, showing how you can use Blockchain to create an immutable record of BIM (or engineering data) at a given point in time to create a digital record you can trust. All this, with not a bitcoin in sight...
    Technology
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 11:15 - 12:00
    The pillars of lean construction are "right 1st time", "build in quality" and "just in time", so how can technology work within a project to deliver a focused lean delivery? See how lean design and construction methodology, including lean process and workflows and the Autodesk BIM 360 platform, can work hand in hand in focused delivery reducing risk and delays. With a completely connected project team, advanced analytics monitor activities and performance can even be applied across multiple projects, presented in simple dashboards to keep stakeholders informed for early decision making, giving more control from design to site to manage delivery. Each component of a project relies on other areas and lean construction needs be at the heart of the process across the entire project team from design to build.
    People
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 12:00 - 12:45
    What if we thought of a building as a product, and applied advanced manufacturing processes and technologies to the way we construct the building? You'll have to attend Adam's talk to find out! In this session, Adam is going to make you think a little differently about what happens when we industrialise construction. How we can expand upon the principles of Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) and how industrialised construction will enable economic, social and financial opportunities, while also highlighting possible risks. Using two of his BIM.Technologies projects – Victoria Gate in Leeds (a stunning and award-winning piece of architecture) and Park View Student Village in Newcastle upon Tyne (a student accommodation scheme, built in record time thanks to off-site manufacturing processes) – Adam will look at how the beginning of industrialised construction is not that far away, and where it is rapidly advancing to. Following these real-life projects, Adam will turn to the future, addressing what is driving this industrialised change and how digital technologies and processes are key enablers, with technologies like Robotics, Machine Learning, Computational Design and Digital Twin.
    Next Generation
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 12:00 - 12:45
    This session will review and consolidate how the international standard for BIM can realistically be implemented across the globe. Rebecca will discuss how the ISO will be used across the UK and other regions of the world. You will learn how Standards play an important part in any industry – providing consistency, consolidation and process when it comes to implementing a solution. In many regions of the world we have been lacking the consistency to utilise standards on a BIM project, and projects are generally a mismatch of differing processes, terms and applications for BIM. Language is disjointed where we use a combination of local and international language to define documents and processes. This must change so that we can begin to work on a global scale for BIM. The opportunity that presents itself is the release of ISO 19650-1 and ISO 19650-2. This session will give an overview of the standard, a review of the regional annexe for the UK, and an overview of how the standard is effectively going to be used around the world.
    Stories
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 12:00 - 12:45
    Wembley Park is an 85-acre site surrounding the iconic Wembley stadium. Unlike the many regeneration developments of this size, there is a single client and the majority of the housing will be destined for private rental (PRS). The developer, Quintain, is investing £2 billion to deliver a new neighbourhood for London, with 7000 homes and over 8000 jobs. As they will be retaining and managing their site, they recognised that BIM could provide enormous efficiency savings at both CAPEX and OPEX stages. This presentation will discuss how some BIM level 2 processes were adopted by the entire supply chain to deliver asset information models for Quintain's FM company; Tipi. You will learn what has worked and what has failed, and how the information manager, FL Innovations, has policed the data for 11 live projects with several hundred BIM models.
    Stories
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 12:00 - 12:45
    In this session, Kay Rogage will introduce a 3D data visualisation dashboard for effectively presenting and understanding complex sensor data within BIM models. Huge volumes of data are generated by buildings to give us a better understanding of how buildings are used. Data such as temperature, humidity and energy consumption can be captured through IoT sensor technology to capture building performance and occupant behaviour. Data relating to building maintenance however, can be captured through repair requests, service plans and product warrantees and building use can be gathered through occupant surveys. Whereas, heterogeneous data sets spread across systems and in numerous formats – meaning that drawing conclusions between performance gaps of buildings as designed and in use is limited. Better data gathering protocols and analysis models can provide advice to building managers, to mitigate poor performance in use and close the loop to designers and construction to evidence the causes of the gaps. Kay and her team have developed a 3D data visualisation platform that integrates data across protocols and provides actionable advice for building managers and owners. The platform was developed in collaboration with a social housing organisation to demonstrate the feasibility of the platform. In this session, she will present the work they have done, discuss the problems encountered with bringing data sets together, and demonstrate what types of information can be meaningful to building owners and managers.
    Next Generation
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 12:50 - 13:10
    Software Lounge
    Where
    Software Lounge in The Cheryl Classroom

  • 13:15 - 13:35
    Software Lounge
    Where
    Software Lounge in The Cheryl Classroom

  • 14:00 - 14:45
    The UKRI has set a challenging four-year programme to “transform” construction in the UK. This government led initiative focuses on three key areas for improvement; digital, manufacturing of buildings and through life performance. In this talk, Sam, in his role as Challenge Director will highlight the core areas of the project and what this means to the modern digital building environment, and how it will shape the future to come. The future of construction weighs heavily on the need for change, greater efficiencies in the way we design and build, and how we manage our assets upon project completion. The aim of this challenge is to set the trajectory for 33% whole life cost reductions 50% savings in time onsite, 50% reduction on greenhouse gas emissions and a 50% improvement on export activity. During this session, Sam will map out the strategy for how these savings will be realised.
    Technology
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 14:00 - 14:45
    … finally, they believe you! Many people know what BIM is. In essence, it is procedural best practice which, whilst open to some interpretation, is fairly well documented. What people don't know is how to change all of their professional habits picked up from many years working in an industry telling them this is the way things should be done. So why would people want to change? What's in it for them? We tell people that BIM is better, but do they believe us? This presentation will look at the human aspect of BIM, across the whole asset lifecycle from Design to Demolition. We know where we want to be, but do we know how to get there?
    People
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 14:00 - 14:45
    This session will start by looking at the challenges we face in the industry. Recent reports have highlighted that the industry needs to digitalize now and it may be a revolution that is needed and not an evolution. Richard will look at what how BIM adoption can truly happen. How through motivation, collaboration and enablement it will be possible to take an industry into a modern digital world. As chief executive of NBS, a business that is both a global leader in BIM and also local to the North East, Richard will outline how NBS will play a big part in supporting the industries global transition.
    Stories
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 14:00 - 14:45
    As BIM projects become ever more complex, performing analysis of project data is an important component in the repertoire of an Information Manager. Scripting tools like dynamo and node-red are allowing a new generation of IMs to access model data, and summary tools like PowerBI and Tableau make it all look very pretty. The only problem is that more often than not, all this data is over-simplified into basic charts or focusing on irrelevant data – losing many, if not all the benefits. Fed up with just replicating what could be performed in Excel, Michael challenged himself to pull data from his own life (i.e., ‘not Revit’) to demonstrate the story-telling power of dashboards – and why you need to use them.
    People
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 14:45 - 15:15
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 15:45 - 16:30
    This session will introduce Smart Infrastructure as a concept and the drivers behind its adoption for UK asset owner and operators. The role of BIM in the use of Smart Infrastructure applications for new and existing assets will be addressed and examples of Smart Infrastructure applications and outcomes will be showcased, alongside future uses. Smart Infrastructure allows asset owners to see the unseen, by gaining intelligent insights into their operations through analysis of asset specific data. The availability of such data is ever-increasing, but outputs based on the data are not yet commonplace. Sean will ask, how can the industry use this information to gain efficiencies and enable sustainable outcomes to be reached? And as the creation of data-rich BIM models facilitates Smart Infrastructure, by embedding structured information into asset models during the project lifecycle. Key to this is the formation of asset owner specific OIR’s (Organizational Information Requirements), AIR’s (Asset Information Requirements) and EIR’s (Employer’s Information Requirements) that determine why, what and how information will be developed and made available for use during the lifecycle of the asset. Over four years on from the publication of PAS1192-3, how can the scarcity of asset owner OIR’s and AIR’s be addressed? Sean will look at what are the current applications of Smart Infrastructure technology, and how are these impacting organisations and society, and what does the future hold for Smart Infrastructure, and who/what are the enablers and blockers to the progress of these future solutions?
    Stories
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 15:45 - 16:30
    How can technology providers and contractors align to better define standards around going digital? The promise of going digital is that information is made accessible for all, and redundant work processes can be automated: saving project teams valuable time by improving jobsite communication. However, without standards specific to construction, the creation of digital information is inconsistent at best. This creates a barrier to realising the benefits from ‘going digital’ and introduces additional risk as the right information isn’t getting to the field. The result is information shared is either lost or too complex, duplicate entry is unavoidable and automated workflows suffer, creating greater interoperability issues. Construction teams are starting to open a dialog with designers and owners to define digital standards for construction in the US and Sweden. These standards are driving contractors to define “what information matters”, “how they need it shared”, so they can better leverage data from design, into construction and ultimately into handover.
    Technology
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 15:45 - 16:30
    As early adopters in Digital Construction Workflows, EPR has managed to bridge the gap between traditional workflows, expectations and new digital construction workflows. As Digital Design Tech Team, in conjunction with the Architectural teams, EPR has managed to develop ways to drive the collaboration using data. The harnessing of data can whitewash what is most important, so correct visualisation of the relevant data has become key to drive the collaboration processes. In this session, René and Jędrzej will discuss how the traditional 2D processes creates a “tunnel” vision and is not aligned with working in a 3D digital world. 2D deliverables have created an embedded linear approach to production of construction projects. However, in a 3D world this is not realistic. Deliverables in the Digital Construction space is often a free-form dance, adjusting to the most relevant input needed to construct a volumetric puzzle.
    Technology
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 15:45 - 16:30
    As the AEC Industry is becoming increasingly Digital, we find ourselves caught in a perpetual discussion about the lack of technological innovation within the AEC Industry. We try to break this vicious circle and give the discourse a new direction by revealing the History of the Digital Architect – an outline of a profession rooted deep within the origins of the Human Civilization but with future that is yet to be revealed. Are we automating ourselves out of our jobs or do are we enhancing our toolset? This is all part of this discussion.
    Stories
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 16:30 - 17:15
    The Winfield Rock Report was launched exclusively at BIM Show Live 2018. Since then, it has been downloaded over a thousand times by people from across the world, including countries like Kuwait and the USA, and has been cited as a leading reference paper in talks in countries as far away as India. It has also been nominated in the Digital & BIM Initiative category of the Building Awards 2018. Building Magazine reviewed the report, commenting that it; “would recommend the report to anyone interested in BIM”. Meanwhile, leading global law firm Eversheds Sutherland proclaimed that; “it is essential reading for anyone in construction”. The legal community has also come together to organise events and BIM progression under BIM4Legal, one of the key outputs of the report. This sort of openness in the legal industry could be said to be almost mythical. But what real and lasting impact has the Winfield Rock Report actually had? Will it be relegated to an academic text or will it make waves and push the revolution that the authors intended? In this talk, May Winfield will examine for the first time, the impact of the Report – including the changes it brought to the CIC BIM Protocol, the rumoured introduction of a Level 2 definition and development of BIM4Legal.
    Stories
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 16:30 - 17:15
    This session will focus on the latest International Standard, the ISO 19650, but from a UK perspective. Paul Shillcock, one of the co-authors of ISO 19650, will share the story behind ISO 19650, providing an overview. Emma Hooper will then take us through the implementation of ISO 19650 from a UK perspective, highlighting the differences and talking through the UK Annex and Transitional Guidance Document. Andy Boutle will provide an overview of BSI B555/8 and the work they are doing on the UK Guidance Framework. You will also hear how this group will communicate with you to draw feedback from the industry and how you can get involved.
    Stories
    Where
    The Holly Classroom

  • 16:30 - 17:15
    BIM and new software technology, alongside the introduction of new data-driven design approaches, means that the traditional role of architects is changing. A research project has been undertaken that discussed with ten leading architects and data-driven designers their thoughts on what data driven design is, the skills required for the future and how the role may change. This talk will summarise the research project and communicate that architects may need to adopt data-driven strategies to respond to construction industry strategies such as the UK Government Construction 2025 report. This report targets a reduction in carbon emissions, project cost and programme duration – how will these challenges be met? The research demonstrates that architects, alongside the wider design team, will need to change to meet these challenges with new data-driven initiatives. This talk is aimed at architects and construction industry professionals. The research has been undertaken to promote new data-driven approaches that support a reduction in time, increase efficiency and move the profession of architects forward. It is also aimed at those who would like to adopt more data-driven approaches to increase efficiency and meet future targets.
    Next Generation
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 16:30 - 17:15
    In this interactive session, Elizabeth Kavanaugh will explain in words that Winnie the Pooh could understand why behaviours are a key part of the change process, how behaviours enable collaboration, and the ten key collaborative behaviours. This talk will showcase the free-to-use behavioural tool devised by the BIM group, Behaviours4Collaboration, and you will have a chance to reflect on how you could develop your own behaviours.
    People
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 17:15 - 17:30
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • Day 2

    28 February

  • 09:30 - 09:45

  • 09:45 - 10:30

  • 11:00 - 11:45
    A review of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in current AEC practice and an industry consensus on where AI will, or could have, the biggest impact in our everyday working lives. This will enhance and fundamentally restructure our universe, so how do we influence and drive it for the greater good?
    Next Generation
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 11:00 - 11:45
    The construction of a new acute hospital in Denmark represents a unique opportunity to develop next practice within healthcare, architecture and design. For Region Hovedstaden, this was the ambition, but to get there within the given budget they would need to bring digitised construction to the next level – to maximise, productivity, minimise wasted time and mitigate risks. But how? From the start, Region Hovedstaden questioned how IT can transform and improve the construction of their hospital. With the use of Virtual Reality, doctors and nurses were able to view the project at the model and comment early on with world-class architects, Herzog & de Meuron. BIM was used to perform a fully detailed design and integrating their database of IT and medico equipment, and all information such as design documents and VR. But will they really walk the talk? Due to a lack of serious demand, contractors are rarely expected to digitise the construction process. In this tender, Region Hovedstaden committed to deliver the most digital construction project in Denmark to date.
    Technology
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 11:00 - 11:45
    As investigations into the causes of the Grenfell catastrophe progressed, everyone seemed amazed that no one involved in refurbishing or managing the building knew all the products and materials that had been installed. This is a shocking fact. For many years, as an industry we have been struggling to produce adequate handover information. Just as importantly, when it does exist, it is not updated as things are replaced. Dame Judith Hackitt recommended that BIM should be mandated on all HRRBs of 10 storeys or more: “Having BIM-enabled datasets during occupation means that duty-holders will have a suitable evidence base through which to deliver their responsibilities and maintain safety and integrity throughout the life-cycle of a building. Information can be updated as and when changes are made during the building life-cycle”. Although it is true that, implemented perfectly, the BIM processes can address many of these issues, we are still reliant on people. It is seldom deployed perfectly, particularly from an asset information perspective. In this session, Andrew aka ‘Das’, Lloyd and George, will look at the process of how to implement that Golden Thread to maximum effect, using the relationship they have built as a team on collective DMA, Airey Miller and Activeplan projects. They start with the end in mind, with a focus on providing the whole supply-chain with an explicit set of asset information requirements.
    Stories
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 11:00 - 11:45
    As a BIM Manager, Vicki’s objective was to help to create efficient practices that would reduce time spent on site and, as a result, reduce environmental impact of the construction industry. She learnt her craft and eventually joined Multiplex. The BIM team there were (and still are) exceptional but, as in most cases, operating alongside traditional processes – not embedded within them. Everyone in the business needed to be up-skilled, but they’d already tried before. To be successful, they needed to approach this differently. Enrolling the whole company on a 3-day Revit course wouldn’t cut it. So Vicki stepped out of her comfort zone and left her “tribe”. She moved in to the Learning & Development team and began, with the Head of Digital Construction, to develop digital capabilities across the organisation, led from an established centralised business unit. They wanted to give people the tools to take control of digital processes themselves and allow the newly named “Digital Construction Team” to become the auditors, the assistors and the accelerators of digital development. And they’re seeing huge successes already. Moving from one team to another was a massive risk for Vicki; she was comfortable in her BIM bubble. It was also a risk for the business, but they put their trust in her and have been open and receptive to the change. In this session, Vicki will discuss making that leap, and how it was terrifying but necessary for both her, and the organisation’s, continued development.
    Stories
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 11:45 - 12:30
    The adoption of BIM within the residential sector has not been as strong as with the rest of the AEC industry. This is mainly due to the residential sector presenting its own unique challenges and quirks, including the considerable investment of time and resources developers require, the way developers are structured to deliver projects and a noticeable skills shortages across the industry. However, there are encouraging times ahead, with strong progress being made in both large developers and small supply chain members alike, to make greater use of BIM. This is resulting in new ways of thinking and increased opportunities for efficiency in a sizeable chunk of the construction market. From large high-rise developments to house building, this talk will explore the contribution that BIM has already, and will continue to bring to residential construction.
    Stories
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 11:45 - 12:30
    Companies of all sizes are looking to transition into using BIM and standardising the procedures in an office helps. The ideal case scenario, versus the real-life situations you arrive at offices, however, are very far from each other. In this session, Katya will look at “organic” implementation: what issues does it cause and at what stage of it the need for standardisation arises. She will talk about the hurdles and opportunities she has encountered implementing standards, looking at technical issues as well as the soft skills required to help a team transition in a happy and confident way.
    Stories
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 11:45 - 12:30
    The construction industry historically has a poor record of achieving gender parity in its workforce. Globally, there is a considerable shortage of the professionals needed to fulfil the demand of growing populations by constructing the buildings and infrastructures we live and work in. This skills shortage could be fulfilled by women, who remain one of the most underutilised business resources. The shortage of women in the construction industry has been investigated extensively by academics and industry practitioners; however, despite this comprehensive research, and the acknowledgement and increased awareness of the issues faced by women in the industry, little has changed over the last few decades. Given the business case for making changes that would increase economic growth and productivity, this session will give an overview of the research conducted by the University of Cambridge. The session will present the barriers to entry for women found in the sector as well as the best practices identified in the industry. Best practice was found in a London-based construction company where gender parity has been achieved in an extraordinarily short length of time. Ultimately, the session will put forward a practical framework for companies willing to gain benefit from a gender-balanced workforce.
    People
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 11:45 - 12:30
    It has always been hard to justify anything that adds cost to the process of design and construction of projects. Construction verification is a good example of this, offering so much potential to reduce cost through early discovery of construction errors but easy to use only when a problem has become critical. In this session, Robert will make the case for verification throughout projects, giving examples of steel work, partition and services geometric verification at different stages of using different capture methods. This will be followed by a discussion of the how verification programming needs to be considered during a project. Robert will discuss practical approaches to the process when applied both on site or for producing better ‘as built’ information. He will answer questions about tolerance and discuss the circumstances under which action should and, perhaps more importantly, shouldn’t take place. Finding problems is only half the issue: communicating them and reviewing whether they require action needs to be supported. In this session, he will show a series of examples of the visual methods for illustrating issues. Robert will also discuss an approach to train site staff (or other third parties) to collect data to be sent back for processing, and how this fits into a plan to record and verify everything at the time of completion. Robert will finish with a discussion of the role verification can play in supporting the production of high quality ‘as built’ information.
    Technology
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 12:30 - 13:00
    Lunchtime Sessions
    Where
    The Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 12.35 - 12.55
    Software Lounge
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 13:05 - 13:20
    Lunchtime Sessions
    Where
    The Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 13:25 - 13:40
    Lunchtime Sessions
    Where
    The Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 13.00 - 13.45
    Software Lounge
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 13:45 - 14:15

  • 14:15 - 15:00
    Why are we still banging on about BIM? Why don't people get it? Because they've never been told through the medium of musical theatre! Rodgers and Hammerstein take us through the Status Report with "Getting To Know You" and teach us collaborative working with "You'll Never Walk Alone" – join us on our musical journey through BS/PAS 1192 (and perhaps even ISO 19650)! By the end of our presentation, when, like the revolutionaries of Les Mis, we ask, "Do you Hear the People Sing?", clients everywhere will respond with "You're The One That I Want" and BIM will reign supreme across the land!
    People
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 14:15 - 15:00
    Architects and designers today work with a variety of tools within the construction industry. Arguably, there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ tool that succeeds in being advantageous for all design stages. However, Zaha Hadid Architects we have developed a process by which technology is the driving force behind which tools they work with. In this presentation, Mark Winnington will explore the challenges of design to BIM production in the context of teams working with a variety of platforms to create intricate freeform, fluid and parametric geometry, as well as insight into the methods of how these challenges can be met. Mark will guide you through this process, using examples of workflows which expose efficiencies in effort, time and resource for the team at Zaha Hadid Architects.
    Technology
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 14:15 - 15:00
    The UK is internationally recognised as a global leader in the introduction of BIM, creating significant global interest in the UK’s experience over the last eight years and a demand for UK BIM expertise. The Centre for Digital Built Britain’s (CDBB) international team works with partner countries through collaborative agreements to offer a strategic framework to deliver BIM at national and organisational level based on experience within the UK and existing international collaborations such as the European Union and Chile. As partner countries develop and implement their national transformation programmes, learning from UK experience and based on common international principles, it creates trade opportunities for companies with UK BIM expertise. In this session Richard will explore how and where opportunities are being created, identifying the information and support available to new and existing UK exporters.
    People
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 14:15 - 15:00
    Statutory approvals by IFC submission is not a fantasy: it’s part of the strategy for Digital Built Britain. This talk reports on industry appetite for digitisation of statutory approval, focusing on the Building Regulations and offers an exploration of how we can map our system, which requires interpretation of written policy, to a strategy of elemental measurement and verification. Rosemarie will cover international precedents for digital compliance checking, the software currently available for audit, and examine how we might set out rules and decision processes to a digital interface. Also, how IFC model submission for Building Regulations can aid the inspector to assess construction details both on and off-site. To illustrate how we can work towards a digital compliance checking, Rosemarie will show examples of Bryden Wood's in-house elemental technical guidance, which aligns to digital delivery and sets out the constraints for each building element. This enables the development of in-house checking of compliance to the building regulations as part of our model audit. The talk is based on insights gained through involvement in CDBB research groups, and individual research into digitisation of statutory approval and the digital strategies of Bryden Wood.
    Next Generation
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 15:00 - 15:45
    Early stage feasibility assessments are key to realising development potential. Yet for most they are still a manual, time-consuming process with very little verifiable data as output. A new methodology exists, however, that allows those in architecture, engineering and construction to automate and drastically improve results. Utilising cloud-based generative design software, thousands of design options can now be explored to find the ideal solution. With an automated feasibility design process using generative design, designers and engineers are able to outline design goals along with any specific constraints. These designs can be imported directly into BIM-authoring platforms for further design development, as well as detailed provisioning and commercial viability calculations. Using the development's overall commercial criteria, generated design options can then be ranked and filtered down to a few high-performing options, allowing for significant capital expenditure decisions to be truly data-driven and based on provable datasets, compliant designs and verifiable commercial calculations. Join this session with Radu and Álvaro to see how designtech first built a prototype using familiar BIM and computational tools to demonstrate the viability of this approach, and how they are now turning this into a full-fledged cloud platform.
    Next Generation
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 15:00 - 15:45
    Recent achievements in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) are often present in public medias as a thrilling bit of news igniting public discussion. However, very little attention is paid to new applications of AI in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry (AEC). The thesis can be broadly divided into two parts: the first part (chapters 1, 2 and 3) attempts to give a context, and to provide a brief review of current research results where methods of AI were applied to problems with origins in the AEC industry; the second part (chapters from 4 to 7) presents an example application of Machine Learning (ML) methods in structural engineering. The thesis follows findings presented and described in a PhD dissertation, titled “Generalizable Surrogate Models for The Improved Early-Stage Exploration of Structural Design Alternatives in Building Construction”, developed and defended by Mehdi Nourbakhsh in 2016.
    Next Generation
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 15:00 - 15:45
    Having served 24 years in the Royal Engineer as a civil engineer and finishing as a senior soldier, Andrew has decided to transition into the world of digital transformation aka BIM. To further his knowledge, Andrew wrote his MSc dissertation on the cultural impact of BIM in the construction industry and would like to share his findings with us. In the past many have tried to implement BIM within the Royal Engineers and been unsuccessful, so Andrew decided to research the subject from a senior soldiers point of view and focus on adoption barriers. These adoption barriers for BIM are in two categories: management barriers and training barriers. Among the training barriers, literature highlights that BIM was not often taught in universities, so young engineers and architects were not aware of the new technologies. One of the key focuses of Andrew’s investigation was to establish if technology is the main driver, and if so should the process of technological evolution be taught in the universities, so students are aware of the techniques and understand their differences, since sometimes there is confusion related to what is BIM exactly. This was through technological evolutionary processes, as well as the characteristics of the methods. Andrew’s session will also use the findings from Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) interviews combined with analysis of various commercial ‘best practice’ experiences to suggest solutions to the challenges identified.
    People
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 15:00 - 15:45
    This session will show how WilkinsonEyre and consultants tracked clashes and improved BIM coordination communications on the 50-storey tower at 6-8 Bishopsgate, London. The architectural, structural and MEP teams on the project tracked all clash issues using BIM Track, allowing issue details to be accessible in a central hub for coordination and quick access of issues in Revit® and Navisworks.Fabio will show the BCF-enabled workflow via Solibri Model Checker to import clashes issues to BIM Track and collaborate with consultants through IFC files. BIM Track enables the model to be visualised in a web browser, giving access to your data anytime and anywhere – including desktop and mobile devices. In this session, see how clashes were raised, visualized and resolved using WilkinsonEyre’s workflow.
    Technology
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 15:45 - 16:30
    In April 2016, when BIM Level 2 went live, the UK was firmly in the EU, Donald Trump was that guy who fired people on the TV, and construction was a failing industry. Skip forward three years and the world looks a very different place … and the image of construction is starting to change. In construction, drones and robotics are being seriously explored on sites around the world. 3D Printing has built houses and bridges, AI and Machine Learning are being applied to projects, and computational design is not just in the hands of experimental architects. Why then, are contractors going bust and projects are still running late and over budget? Why is PDF still the closest most projects come to becoming digital? Has BIM Level 2 failed, and will ISO 19650 change the industry in ways PAS 1192 could not? Come to Lee’s session and find out.
    People
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

  • 15:45 - 16:30
    You might wonder what the adoption of digital technologies and the advances in gender parity have in common? They are both underrepresented minorities in construction – a situation which has stifled our industry to modernise and improve. Interestingly, progress in both domains is held back by the same mindset common to most construction professionals. In this session, Thomas and Cristina will dissect this prevailing mindset in detail. They will explore conversational strategies which should be deployed when shifting some of the burden of educating digital and gender transformation away from BIM experts or PARITY advocates, and on to people who might be considered digital construction companions or gender parity allies in the shared struggle to modernise architecture, engineering and construction. Both speakers will argue that technology evangelists are perfectly placed to advance conversations about gender parity – and vice versa – because both groups have vested interests and personal stakes in supporting the transition from captive cults to culture change in construction.
    People
    Where
    The Holly Classroom (formerly the Ant Classroom ...)

  • 15:45 - 16:30
    In 2014, the UK Government funded the development of a classification system to 'complete Level 2 BIM' (now known as BIM according to ISO 19650). NBS was the lead organisation who delivered this 'digital tool for building information modelling' and developed a digital plan of work tool and also the Uniclass 2015 classification system. In his presentation, Stephen - who led the BIM Toolkit project - will tell the story behind the Uniclass 2015 development and will also reflect on its use now, in both the UK and throughout the world. Uniclass use-cases will also be presented that align to the ISO 19650 framework. These will include use in Exchange Information Requirements, BIM Execution Plans, Modelling, Specification, Asset Management and Product Information Management. If the UK's approach to BIM is adopted worldwide, then Uniclass 2015 could be the classification system that is used to digitally model the built environment worldwide. In this presentation you'll hear the story behind its development.
    Technology
    Where
    The Dec Classroom

  • 15:45 - 16:30
    The problem of deciding on how to pack too many books onto small bookshelves at home served as a fruitful testing ground for Thomas Currie to develop his knowledge of Dynamo and its extensions. He could experiment with techniques that can have wider application outside of this toy scenario. The first task for Dynamo was to check and validate the information about the books he owned and build a virtual model of them. Then he needed to decide how to order the books and make the best use of the space available. There were many possibilities in sorting: alphabetically by title or name; size, colour, category, etc. He had too little shelf-space to just start at one end and work his way to the end. Each shelf needed to work hard with books laid horizontally on top of shorter runs or two layers to take up the full depth. Thomas used a combination of many techniques to build his Dynamo definitions. These included linking to APIs, finding solutions in custom packages created by other users, creating his own custom nodes, writing Python scripts, finding and adapting code from GitHub (including a bin-packing algorithm developed for the US Air Force) and incorporating them into C# ZeroTouch nodes.The final part was to extend the model into the real world with the use of augmented reality to make finding books easier. The aim was to create a flexible and adaptive model for organising his books which was responsive to future changes. All without having to move a book before deciding on a scheme.
    Technology
    Where
    The Cheryl Classroom

  • 16:30 - 16:45
    Where
    Sir Bobby Robson Stage

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